Master’s in Mass Communications

"Powering Silicon Valley and beyond by creating content, telling stories, shaping messages, and launching ideas through digital, traditional, and social media."

Study Public Relations, Advertising, and Journalism in Silicon Valley

Located in the heart of Silicon Valley, SJSU’s School of Journalism and Mass Communications offers a Master of Science degree designed to help public relations, advertising and journalism professionals expand their knowledge and develop research and multimedia skills needed for leadership positions in their respective fields. Our state-of-the-art approach to teaching multimedia communication – which emphasizes cross-platform storytelling – attracts students and support worldwide. Silicon Valley firms and top national and local businesses seek our graduates, recognizing our reputation for excellence in multimedia and strategic communication education.

Our program offers a research track leading to a thesis, and a professional track leading to a multimedia or strategic communication project. Courses in both tracks are taught mostly in the evening to accommodate students holding daytime jobs. The Graduate School of San Jose State University administers the application process for all SJSU graduate programs.

Click here for university admission requirements and application deadlines and instructions: http://www.sjsu.edu/gape/prospective_students/

In addition to university admission requirements, JMC has supplemental requirements for applicants. Click here for those requirements: JMC Supplemental Requirements for Applicants

If you have questions about JMC’s graduate program, contact the graduate program coordinator, Dr. Mathew Cabot at 

Graduate Program Curriculum

The School of Journalism and Mass Communications offers a 30-unit, three-semester Master’s of Science (M.S.) degree program that culminates either with a thesis or project. The 24-unit core curriculum was designed to help students understand the theories and master the skills that are driving emerging communication technologies, whether they be in public relations, advertising or journalism. The other six units are electives students choose that are tailored toward their thesis (Plan A) or project (Plan B).

 

Plan A (Thesis) Required Courses

  • MCOM 210: MEDIA AND SOCIAL ISSUES (3 units). Selected readings and group discussions of significant published works dealing with mass communications: history, biography and appraisals; law and ethics of the print and broadcast media, advertising and public relations; public opinion and propaganda.
  • MCOM 215: NEW MEDIA VISIONARIES (3 units). Class lecture series by visiting Silicon Valley leaders on the development of new media products, including such topics as idea generation, intellectual property, funding, design, development and integrated communication strategies.
  • MCOM 270: COMMUNICATION LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY (3 units). A case history approach to the law of communications, including libel, privacy and regulation of broadcasting. Major development and landmark decisions, with emphasis on contemporary ethical and social issues such as free–press/fair trial and new technology.
  • MCOM 290: THEORY OF MASS COMMUNICATIONS (3 units). Basic theories of communications systems. Functional comparisons of various communications systems in relation to political structure. Communications theories in related disciplines of psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics and political science. Prerequisite: MCOM 210 or instructor consent.
  • MCOM 295: MASS COMMUNICATIONS RESEARCH (3 units). Methodologies of research in mass communications: historical, descriptive and empirical with emphasis upon statistical aspects of data processing and interpretation. Prerequisite: MCOM 210 and MCOM 290 or instructor consent.
  • MCOM 298: SPECIAL STUDIES IN MASS COMMUNICATIONS (1–6 units). Independent studies in specific areas of mass communications. Repeatable for credit (not in the same semester). Note: 3 units for Plan B projects. Grading: C/NC
  • MCOM 299: MASTER'S THESIS (3–6 units). Supervised thesis in the field of mass communications. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the master's degree and approval of thesis proposal. Repeatable for credit (not in the same semester). Grading: C/NC

 

Plan B (Project) Required Courses

  • MCOM 210: MEDIA AND SOCIAL ISSUES (3 units). Selected readings and group discussions of significant published works dealing with mass communications: history, biography and appraisals; law and ethics of the print and broadcast media, advertising and public relations; public opinion and propaganda.
  • MCOM 215: NEW MEDIA VISIONARIES (3 units). Class lecture series by visiting Silicon Valley leaders on the development of new media products, including such topics as idea generation, intellectual property, funding, design, development and integrated communication strategies.
  • MCOM 270: COMMUNICATION LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY (3 units). A case history approach to the law of communications, including libel, privacy and regulation of broadcasting. Major development and landmark decisions, with emphasis on contemporary ethical and social issues such as free–press/fair trial and new technology.
  • MCOM 284: INTERACTIVE PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3 units). Students will work in teams to create, develop and implement hypothetical Web and mobile applications while living the role of the interactive project manager, design manager, and development manager. This class focuses on the rapidly changing creative and technological vase of interactive Web and mobile application development.
  • MCOM 285: NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES (3 units). An examination of new technologies and the ways they influence and converge with traditional media and other communication specialties. Social, political, and regulatory aspects of emerging technologies are discussed.
  • MCOM 290: THEORY OF MASS COMMUNICATIONS (3 units). Basic theories of communications systems. Functional comparisons of various communications systems in relation to political structure. Communications theories in related disciplines of psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics and political science.
  • MCOM 295: MASS COMMUNICATIONS RESEARCH (3 units). Methodologies of research in mass communications: historical, descriptive and empirical with emphasis upon statistical aspects of data processing and interpretation.

MCOM 298: SPECIAL STUDIES IN MASS COMMUNICATIONS (1–6 units). Independent studies in specific areas of mass communications. Repeatable for credit (not in the same semester). Note: 3 units for Plan B projects. Grading: C/NC

Dr. Mathew Cabot, JMC Graduate Program Coordinator

Office: DBH 212
E-mail:
Phone: (408) 924-3273

Mathew Cabot is an associate professor of public relations in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications. He holds a doctoral degree in communication from Regent University. He previously worked as a public relations professional both in the Bay Area and Los Angeles, primarily in high tech and medical devices. Cabot has published articles in The Journal of Mass Media EthicsThe Journal of Communication and ReligionMedia Ethics Magazine, and The Journal of Corporate Citizenship. His expertise is in public relations, strategic integrated communication, corporate social responsibility, media ethics, global leadership, and international education.